Saturday, August 08, 2009

Arts & Craft- Averil M. Burleigh





I went to my shed today to find some papers for book making and happened across this old magazine called The Studio which I had stuck away- it is dated from April 15 1913, and is in slightly tattered condition. I also have been doing some research on the Arts & Craft Movement ( in preparations for the Creative Arts Safari tour in England, Belgium and Paris next year) and long and behold I stumbled across these lovely illustrations by Averil M Burleigh. The accompanying article qoutes the late Sir George Reid, member and president of the Royal Scottish Academy as saying womens' art as being "deplorable" and "they appear" he is reported to have said " to be the work of young ladies who have nothing to do and who therefore 'paint a little' without having the faintest notion of drawing or colouring. They are all anxious to have their pictures exhibited, but they have no idea of working honestly and hard in order to produce good work" The article goes on to say " it cannot be denied that there was and still is a great deal of truth in this criticism, even if we allow that it may have been tinged with a little (?????) masculine bias and possibly a general lack of symphathy with feminine work at large." It was also observed that parents often had their daughters taught drawing and painting whilst boys were given no such instruction and that indeed a lot of boys had enbarked upon artistic careers in the face of stern parental opposition. Hmmm- what do I really think about all this???? were women perhaps better trained then men?

The line drawing is entitled "All in a Garden Fair" and the coloured drawing is entitled "A Stately Measure"

5 comments:

Penny said...

It was ever thus, my husbands late aunt who painted in the late 1890's and into the 1900's (and was taught by some of the best of her day) was not supposed to become a member of the South Australian Society of Arts, but she finally did much to the horror of the men. Her paintings were priced far below those of the men too.

patstudio said...

Yes and true. Anonymous was a woman, after all. . . . but oh so 'anxious' to have her little work exhibited. Thank you for an interesting look back at how women have been perceived.

Arashi said...

I have just finished rereading EM Forester's A ROOJM WITH A VIew and this is so well shown inthe characterization of Cecil . aNd in the fear of emotion when a woman chooses to play BEETHOBEN. UNFOTUNAYRLY, THIS IGNORSNCE IS SYILL ABUNDANT IN THE WORLD TODAY. SAD too often the womrn oh this period were considered designers and the e artists. how utterly stupid rven the bauhaus sucumbed ti this ignorance

Arashi said...

forgive my typimg i have parkinsons

Lorie M. said...

What a facinating and wonderful blog you have, I have enjoyed looking and reading. I really love, and am inspired by illustrators, and almost went that way with my art, back in the '80s. Wonderful and interesting post. I will definitely link you to my blog! cheers, Lorie